Recorded Presentations

There are many options for recording and sharing virtual presentations, and different classes will have different preferred methods. Always check with your professor to see if there is a required platform for your class!

If your professor does not have a specific method for recorded presentations in your class, this guide contains a few recommendations for tools available to UMW students.

Recording #

You could always use a camera or phone to record yourself doing a presentation. But if you want to record using your computer with visual aids, below are a couple of options.

Microsoft PowerPoint #

After creating a slideshow in PowerPoint, you have the option to record yourself presenting it. Though you cannot record video with this options, it is a simple one-stop solution if you just need to record narrated slides.

See our Microsoft PowerPoint guide for more info.

Screencast-o-Matic #

With a free Screencast-o-Matic account, you can record a presentation up to 15 minutes, including video from your webcam, PowerPoint slides, or other recordings of your computer screen. Unlike the paid version, a free Screencast-o-Matic account does not allow editing, auto-captioning, or cloud storage of videos.

See Screencast-o-Matic’s guide to their Screen Recorder for Mac, Windows, and Chromebook for more info.

Zoom #

Zoom is a quick, no-frills option for recording a presentation. Simply create a Zoom meeting with yourself as the only participant, start recording, and then give your presentation. You can also use the “Share Screen” feature to record your PowerPoint or other visual aids along with your presentation (alternatively, you could use the video editing tools below to put your visual aids in after recording).

For help getting started with Zoom, see our Zoom guide.


Editing #

If you recorded your presentation perfectly in one take, you can skip this section! Most videos will need a little editing, however.

YouTube Studio Editor #

The YouTube Studio Editor allows you to make basic cuts to your presentation. It does not allow you to add other video clips, graphics, or audio tracks to your presentation. This is a great solution if you are already planning to share your video on YouTube, and only need to make basic cuts.

See our YouTube Basics Step-by-Step guide for more info on creating a YouTube account, uploading a video, and using the video editor.

iMovie #

iMovie is Apple’s free video editing software, available for Mac computers and iOS devices. It is a simple video editor that allows you to trim video, add multiple video clips, and add audio tracks.

iMovie is available on all iMac computers in UMW’s Hurley Convergence Center, and many other places on campus.

See our iMovie tool guide for more info.

OpenShot Video Editor #

OpenShot is free, open source video editing software available for Mac, Windows, and Linux computers. It is a simple video editor that allows you to trim video, add multiple video clips, and add audio tracks.

See our OpenShot tool guide for more info.


Accessibility #

To make sure your video is accessible to all viewers, it is important to embed closed captions and/or provide a transcript.

If you worked from script for your presentation, providing this script along with the video goes a long way to making your video accessible. But even if you do provide a transcript, captions are also recommended.

YouTube Auto-Captions #

All videos uploaded to YouTube are automatically captioned by Google’s voice-to-text algorithm. This removes the vast majority of the work of captioning, but YouTube’s captions always need a little cleaning up to be truly accessible. This is especially true if your recording has background noise or music. Still, since YouTube is also a great option for trimming and sharing your video, this is usually the easiest solution.

See our YouTube Basics Step-by-Step guide for more info on creating a YouTube account, uploading a video, and cleaning up auto-captions.

Accessible Video Guide #

For additional tips, check out our guide on Accessible Video.


Sharing #

YouTube #

YouTube is a convenient platform for storing and sharing videos. However, since it is a public platform, you must be careful to set the privacy settings for your videos correctly. Unless you want your videos to be available to anyone on the internet, most videos should be set to “Unlisted.”

See our YouTube Basics Step-by-Step guide for more info on creating a YouTube account, uploading a video, adjusting privacy settings, and sharing your videos.

Microsoft OneDrive #

Every UMW student has access to a personal OneDrive folder where they can store files, and share them with other members of the UMW community. OneDrive does not auto-caption videos, but it is a useful way to share files if you do not want to use an outwward-facing platform like YouTube.

See our Microsoft OneDrive guide for more information on accessing and using your UMW OneDrive account.

Need Help? #

Have questions about recorded presentations? Book an appointment with a DKC consultant! We can help with any step of the process.

Theme: Overlay by Kaira
Font Resize